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Debit card

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A debit card (also known as a bank card or check card) is a plastic payment card that provides the cardholder electronic access to his or her bank account(s) at a financial institution. Some cards may bear a stored value with which a payment is made, while most relay a message to the cardholder's bank to withdraw funds from a payer's designated bank account. The card, where accepted, can be used instead of cash when making purchases. In some cases, the primary account number is assigned exclusively for use on the Internet and there is no physical card.

In many countries, the use of debit cards has become so widespread that their volume has overtaken or entirely replaced cheques and, in some instances, cash transactions. The development of debit cards, unlike credit cards and charge cards, has generally been country specific resulting in a number of different systems around the world, which were often incompatible. Since the mid-2000s, a number of initiatives have allowed debit cards issued in one country to be used in other countries and allowed their use for internet and phone purchases.

Unlike credit and charge cards, payments using a debit card are immediately transferred from the cardholder's designated bank account, instead of them paying the money back at a later date.

Debit cards usually also allow for instant withdrawal of cash, acting as the ATM card for withdrawing cash. Merchants may also offer cashback facilities to customers, where a customer can withdraw cash along with their purchase.

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Mutual fund

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
This article is about mutual funds in the United States. For other forms of mutual investment, see Collective investment scheme.

A mutual fund is a type of professionally managed collective investment scheme that pools money from many investors to purchase securities. While there is no legal definition of the term mutual fund, it is most commonly applied only to those collective investment vehicles that are regulated and sold to the general public. They are sometimes referred to as "investment companies" or "registered investment companies". Most mutual funds are open-ended, meaning stockholders can buy or sell shares of the fund at any time by redeeming them from the fund itself, rather than on an exchange. Hedge funds are not considered a type of mutual fund, primarily because they are not sold publicly.

In the United States, mutual funds must be registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission, overseen by a board of directors (or board of trustees if organized as a trust rather than a corporation or partnership) and managed by a registered investment adviser. Mutual funds, like other registered investment companies, are also subject to an extensive and detailed regulatory regime set forth in the Investment Company Act of 1940. Mutual funds are not taxed on their income and profits if they comply with certain requirements under the U.S. Internal Revenue Code.

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Cheque

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
A cheque with Thomas Jefferson as payee and payor from 1809 A cheque from 1905 A cheque from 1933 A cheque sample from Canada 2006
       

A cheque (or check in American English) is a document that orders a bank to pay money from an account. The person writing the cheque, the drawer, has a transaction banking account (often called a current, cheque, chequing or checking account) where their money is held. The drawer writes the various details including the monetary amount, date, and a payee on the cheque, and signs it, ordering their bank, known as the drawee, to pay that person or company the amount of money stated.

Cheques are a type of bill of exchange and were developed as a way to make payments without the need to carry large amounts of money. While paper money evolved from promissory notes, another form of negotiable instrument, similar to cheques in that they were originally a written order to pay the given amount to whoever had it in their possession (the "bearer").

Technically, a cheque is a negotiable instrument instructing a financial institution to pay a specific amount of a specific currency from a specified transactional account held in the drawer's name with that institution. Both the drawer and payee may be natural persons or legal entities. Specifically, cheques are order instruments, and are not in general payable simply to the bearer (as bearer instruments are) but must be paid to the payee. In some countries, such as the US, the payee may endorse the cheque, allowing them to specify a third party to whom it should be paid.

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ATM card

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A sample picture of a fictional ATM card.An ATM card (also known as a bank card, client card, key card, or cash card) is any payment card issued by a financial institution to its customers which enables a customer to access an automated teller machine (ATM) for transactions such as deposits, cash withdrawals, obtaining account information, and other types of banking transactions. The payment card may be any card which has that feature enabled, and may be a debit, credit, a limited-use ATM or other card. Interbank networks allow the use of ATM cards at ATMs of financial institutions other than those of the issuing institution.

ATM cards can also be used on improvised ATMs, such as merchants' card terminals that deliver ATM features without any cash drawer (commonly referred to as mini ATMs). These terminals can also be used as Cashless scrip ATMs by cashing the fund transfer receipt at the merchant's Cashier.

The first ATM cards were issued by Barclays in London, in 1967, and by Chemical Bank in Long Island, New York, in 1969.

 

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